9th March – 6th April


Eilidh Morris encourages their self-conscious to work through automatic art-making and expressive use of colour. The creative practice of making imagination art relies on honest self-representation and a belief that there are no real accidents in terms of content. A psychological element is always present and brings greater introspection on completion of a drawing or painting.  Eilidh describes it as imagination art and hopes to evoke conversation and fascination through the dream-like chaos that unfurls on canvas.

‘In Defence of Excessive Sleeping’ is a collection of artworks reflective of Eilidh’s varied artistic styles.  The title refers to Morris’ mental health and the positive effect ‘excessive sleeping’ has on the imagination. Perhaps it is okay to sleep for 15 hours if the result is a burst of curious invention. Each piece tells a different story but all were created in a very emotive and fluid artistic process using paints, pro-markers and POSCA pens. This includes autobiographical portraits such as “Maple Cabin” based on a trip to Canada, and “Paisley 2014”,the latter of which blurs a line between memory and nightmare. Also included are creations which exist wholly in a fantasy realm, such as “It’s Waking Up,” which depicts a huge ‘King Worm’ arising from its slumber in a deep, dark cave, and “Theia”, an imagined portrait of a powerful cosmic being.

Eilidh recently brought their multi-coloured imagination to life with the design and painting of a large, unicorn-themed rhino sculpture in Hamilton’s “The Big Stampede” public art trail in summer of 2017. This was eventually auctioned in aid of Glasgow Children’s Hospital Charity. Also in 2018, Eilidh’s graphite piece “Spinal” was published in North-east Scotland’s Magazine of New Writing, “Pushing out the Boat”, and the illustration “Hyper-Stimulation” was featured in mental health charity Subconscious’ pop-up exhibition in San Francisco to help raise awareness and eradicate stigma associated with mental illness.

“In Defence of Excessive Sleeping” is Morris’ first solo exhibition.

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Eilidh Morris was one of the many talented artists who were part of our group exhibition 2018 Showcase, and we are extremely excited to have them back for their very own solo show!
Be sure to check out more of Morris’ work by following these links:



Do you want to join our creative community?

Keen to learn something new in 2018, and inject some creativity into your week? Here’s your opportunity to find your niche. Whether you’re a novice and want to see what you’re capable of or experienced and want to revisit an old passion…

Then here is your opportunity. We offer classes that could help you to reach your creative aspirations. See if there’s something that takes your fancy…
Upcoming Classes

08.03.2018 – 09.03.2018  Botanical Painting Workshop

10.03.2018 – 11.03.2018 Woodcarving for Beginners 

15.03.2018 – 16.03.2018  Jewellery Workshop



Keep your eyes peeled for updates on our Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.


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12th January – 7th February


Utilising traditional methods of hand carving and wood turning; Dalton’s approach is instinctive. Inspired by nature, with a focus on bold patterns accentuated by intricate detail: Primitive aims to capture the essence of prehistoric art combined with contemporary craftsmanship.

Primitive is a line of wooden works produced by Scottish designer Kirsty Dalton. Handcrafted from cuts of natural wood, each piece is individually shaped and burnt free hand; using a process called Pyrography; complimenting the unique, natural form of this beautiful medium.

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Join Six Foot Gallery as it welcomes a fantastic group of artists that will be exhibiting with us over the next year, along with showcasing the best art that Glasgow and beyond has to offer.

This year’s highly anticipated exhibition will include a variety of painting and sculptural work by:

Tom Brown, Kate Curry, Daniel Donnelly, Róisín Gallagher, Aurore Garnier, Callum Harper, Siobhan Healy, Vincent Langaard, Hannah Lyth, Alice Martin, Michael McVeigh, Gary Milne, Shakir Mughal, Caterina Monasta, Louise Montgomery, Eilidh Morris, Fionnuala Mottishaw, Anne-Marie Pinkerton, Abbey Rawson, Rachael Rebus, Alexandra Sarah and Hayley Whittingham.

In addition, we will have beautiful jewellery on show from Amanda Bernard and Gillian Ryan.

Click here for the floor plan and price list.


30th October – 30th November 2017

Dalnaskhl Design

Gillian has always looked at her surroundings and taken inspiration from what is around her, feeling privileged and humbled by what she finds.

She is fascinated by texture and shape, enjoying materials which are unusual and tactile and appear as if they have they have their own story to tell. The Ayrshire coastline, where she lives and works, features heavily in her designs. As well as the beautiful scenery, rich in inspiration, the area is steeped in history and heritage. Coming from, and returning to live by the seaside has allowed her work to reflect this both through design and materials used, giving her jewellery an organic and natural feel.

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There are two main types of work produced. The first is within the world of fold-forming, or forging, where each piece is individually made by hand and hammer, resulting in unique organic shapes.

The other area is comprised of cast shell pieces as components, where the original moulds have been made from shells collected on the local beach, with the lost wax method then used to produce the metal masters for casting.


6th October – 16th November



Beyond Light

“This latest body of work aims to explore symbolically, both the outer political, social and cultural landscapes of our time, as well as the inner landscapes of the human psyche.

These landscapes are painted intuitively and without any pre-editing, or reference to any particular place in mind.  They evolve naturally and without scrutiny, which allows for a narrative to unfold.

The writings from Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, “For this appalling ocean surrounds this verdant land, so in the soul of man there lies one insular Tahiti, full of peace and joy, but encompassed by all the horrors of the half-lived life” was a starting point to this work and was influential in anchoring the context both at an existential level and ethereal level.


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“Consider the subtleness of the sea; how it’s most dreaded creatures glide underwater, unapparent for the most part, and treacherously hidden beneath the loveliest tints of azure… consider all this; and then turn to this green, gentle and most docile earth; consider them both, the sea and the land; and do you not find strange analogy to something in yourself?” Herman Melville. “

RELICS // KIRSTY DALTON – Jewellery Showcase 2017

2nd October – 26th October 2017



Scottish designer Kirsty Dalton creates her Relics jewellery line by upcycling various fragments of superfluous metals while focusing heavily on colour, texture and decay. Relics takes discarded or scrap jewellery and revitalises it into fresh new designs. In essence, it is a contemporary take on the idea that “one person’s trash is another’s treasure”.

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Each piece is one of a kind; individually handcrafted, composed, arranged, painted and set in resin. These works aim to capture the aura of industrial and derelict areas within the urban cityscape, while simultaneously illustrating the beauty such spaces have to offer.

“I wanted to capture an essence of the people around me, by utilising materials that they have used and discarded. By transforming this range of materials, I hope to address the topic of waste, whilst giving the objects and materials the opportunity to be seen with a sense of reflection and perhaps, even admiration.”

Conceptually, this stemmed from Kirsty’s interest in found objects and how they can effect as well as define certain aspects of our lives. “I believe the process of decay and waste encapsulates a great deal about society and our transformative role within it.”


4th September – 5th October


‘Tradeston R.I.P.’

“As a photographer, the Tradeston area of Glasgow interests me very much. Tradeston is bounded by the River Clyde to the north, the Glasgow to Paisley railway line to the south, Eglinton Street and Bridge Street to the east and West Street to the west. The M74 Extension traverses the hotchpotch of abandoned tenements, burnt out wastelands, low rise 1970’s industrial units, and some new flatted developments – a testament to decades of poor planning and congenital mismanagement by the City Fathers. Tradeston should represent “an open goal” for any Glasgow City Council administration, and should be at the heart of regeneration in the city. Up until now, regeneration has progressed (not always well) in many areas, yet Tradeston, so close to the city centre, remains neglected. The city needs to regenerate that part. It would be pivotal in reconnecting the Southside back across the river.


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I was keen to document this area as it is now, before any proposed regeneration commences – if it ever happens.
Glasgow must be the only city in Europe with a major waterway running through it which does not exploit that in any way. If you go to many European cities such as Bristol, you can see that they have converted their disused docks and shabby warehouses into bars, artspaces, accommodation and shops to create an appealing area for locals and tourists alike to visit and enjoy themselves.

Somehow I don’t think this is going to happen any time soon in Tradeston R.I.P.”

Alastair’s recent exhibitions:
2016 ‘On Returning’ Harbour Arts Centre, Irvine
2016 ‘An Roghainn’ (collaboration with poet Kenneth Steven) Aros Centre, Portree
2017 ‘An Roghainn’ Stanza Poetry Festival, St Andrews
2017 Excerpts from ‘An Roghainn’ Scottish Poetry Library, Edinburgh


1st August 2017 – 31st August 2017


Enzo Marra’s creative practice is concerned with the exploration and pictorial analysis of the art world. He explores the juxtaposing perceptions of those involved and those outwith the industry, their valuing and auctioning, the processes and activities that occur behind the privacy of studio doors, the hanging and display of works animated by the commodified space of the gallery, the milling of observers in exhibition spaces, and ultimately how the public presence then gives life and purpose to the works on display.

The use of texture is of great importance to his practice – lending both added dimensions to the oil paints as well as necessary dominance to his brushwork, which is visible within the final image. The physical dragging and building up of pigment is as relevant in his creations as the tonality and colour balance that they are used to express.

In Siblings, Marra has selected a number of figurative-inspired works, alongside palette-based works, which wholly reflect his own painting practice, whilst providing the leverage to further explore such interrelationships.  The intricate balance between studio activity and what is permitted for public viewing, and the concept of authentic and true pigment application, is explored in this series of acrylic, enamel and oil canvases.

These works have enabled Marra to be selected for the Creekside Open in 2013, 2015 and 2017; the Threadneedle Prize in 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2016; Beep Wales in 2014 and 2016; Gfest in 2010; Charlie Smith Anthology in 2011; the Open West at Gloucester Cathedral in 2012 and the John Moores Painting Prize in 2012 and 2016.

Marra was a prizewinner in the Creekside Open 2017 – selected by Jordan Baseman – and was included on the shortlist for the 100 Painters of Tomorrow. He was also given an honourable mention in the Beers Contemporary Award for Emerging Art 2013.


4th May 2017- 18th May 2017

Jennie Stevenson Rutherglen Ladies 1923
Jennie Stevenson                  Rutherglen Ladies, 19234th May 2017- 18th May 2017

This exhibition has been a development from an earlier project ‘The First Ladies of Football’ which explored the history of women’s football a subject that has been until recently a relatively understudied subject.

Women’s football has been one of the fastest growing sports with an increasing media presence and yet very little is known about its origins and development. This project aims to address this deficit by presenting up to date research supported by artwork and images to tell the history of the Game. ‘Game for Girls’ made its debut at the Annan Museum during the summer of 2015 and to tie in with the upcoming European Championships a new tour of the exhibition kicked off last month at the Scottish Parliament. Among the audience for the show was Dumfriesshire MSP Joan McAlpine along with sports minister Aileen Campbell and local MSP Humza Yousaf, and later in the summer the exhibition will take up residence at the Devil’s Porridge Museum.

Besides artwork, a series of information panels have been produced which explain the development of the game with each panel focusing on a specific part of the story. The first panel for instance focuses on the birth of the game and the first references to women playing football; subsequent panels cover the first association games taking the narrative up to the present day.

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Alongside the Game for Girls exhibition, Stuart is also exhibiting a series of landscape oil paintings.

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Stuart Gibbs: