9th March – 6th April


Eilidh Morris encourages their self-conscious to work through automatic art-making and expressive use of colour. The creative practice of making imagination art relies on honest self-representation and a belief that there are no real accidents in terms of content. A psychological element is always present and brings greater introspection on completion of a drawing or painting.  Eilidh describes it as imagination art and hopes to evoke conversation and fascination through the dream-like chaos that unfurls on canvas.

‘In Defence of Excessive Sleeping’ is a collection of artworks reflective of Eilidh’s varied artistic styles.  The title refers to Morris’ mental health and the positive effect ‘excessive sleeping’ has on the imagination. Perhaps it is okay to sleep for 15 hours if the result is a burst of curious invention. Each piece tells a different story but all were created in a very emotive and fluid artistic process using paints, pro-markers and POSCA pens. This includes autobiographical portraits such as “Maple Cabin” based on a trip to Canada, and “Paisley 2014”,the latter of which blurs a line between memory and nightmare. Also included are creations which exist wholly in a fantasy realm, such as “It’s Waking Up,” which depicts a huge ‘King Worm’ arising from its slumber in a deep, dark cave, and “Theia”, an imagined portrait of a powerful cosmic being.

Eilidh recently brought their multi-coloured imagination to life with the design and painting of a large, unicorn-themed rhino sculpture in Hamilton’s “The Big Stampede” public art trail in summer of 2017. This was eventually auctioned in aid of Glasgow Children’s Hospital Charity. Also in 2018, Eilidh’s graphite piece “Spinal” was published in North-east Scotland’s Magazine of New Writing, “Pushing out the Boat”, and the illustration “Hyper-Stimulation” was featured in mental health charity Subconscious’ pop-up exhibition in San Francisco to help raise awareness and eradicate stigma associated with mental illness.

“In Defence of Excessive Sleeping” is Morris’ first solo exhibition.

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Eilidh Morris was one of the many talented artists who were part of our group exhibition 2018 Showcase, and we are extremely excited to have them back for their very own solo show!
Be sure to check out more of Morris’ work by following these links:



Six Foot Gallery would like to propose this exhibition ‘PEOPLE SHAPE GLASGOW: AN OBSERVATION IN PRINT’ to the members of the Glasgow Print Studio to offer an additional platform to exhibit their works in Glasgow and to see what their observations are of Glasgow and it’s people. Who are the people that shape Glasgow and what marks have they left on the city?

The theme of this exhibition although regional is to be liberal in avenues of thought and direction welcoming experimental interpretations of this title in portraiture, still life, abstract, and landscape.

On entering into our exhibition, we’d also like members to write a short paragraph explaining their visual interpretation to the title to which we would then compile the statements into an exhibition catalogue.

Important dates are as follows:

Digital Submissions Deadline: 20th of September

Hand in dates: 4th/ 5th/ 8th of October

Exhibition: 12th of October – 9th of November

Preview: 12th of October

Maximum 2 works (Space pending).

£5 fee per work entered.

To enter into this exhibition please send images of your work to along with your personal statement.

Please note our office opening hours are: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 10am – 5pm.



9th February – 8th March


Remaining Colours is a series of work which is derived from Shakir Mughal’s previous exhibitions (Chasing Colours – 2016; Blinking Colours – 2015; Dreaming Colours – 2014), sharing a divine affiliation with colour.

“In this work, I have created many forms and shapes with colours in a conceptual way by merging different layers of colours and produced a variety of colourful patterns, differentiating colours and their movements.

Remaining Colours represents the colours that have been left behind during previous exhibitions. However, it is not different from past work. It is produced in the same method and techniques in a very contemporary and abstract way by using colours as a tool to express inner catharsis.”

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Be sure to check out Shakir’s work from Friday 9th February.


12th January – 7th February


Utilising traditional methods of hand carving and wood turning; Dalton’s approach is instinctive. Inspired by nature, with a focus on bold patterns accentuated by intricate detail: Primitive aims to capture the essence of prehistoric art combined with contemporary craftsmanship.

Primitive is a line of wooden works produced by Scottish designer Kirsty Dalton. Handcrafted from cuts of natural wood, each piece is individually shaped and burnt free hand; using a process called Pyrography; complimenting the unique, natural form of this beautiful medium.

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Join Six Foot Gallery as it welcomes a fantastic group of artists that will be exhibiting with us over the next year, along with showcasing the best art that Glasgow and beyond has to offer.

This year’s highly anticipated exhibition will include a variety of painting and sculptural work by:

Tom Brown, Kate Curry, Daniel Donnelly, Róisín Gallagher, Aurore Garnier, Callum Harper, Siobhan Healy, Vincent Langaard, Hannah Lyth, Alice Martin, Michael McVeigh, Gary Milne, Shakir Mughal, Caterina Monasta, Louise Montgomery, Eilidh Morris, Fionnuala Mottishaw, Anne-Marie Pinkerton, Abbey Rawson, Rachael Rebus, Alexandra Sarah and Hayley Whittingham.

In addition, we will have beautiful jewellery on show from Amanda Bernard and Gillian Ryan.

Click here for the floor plan and price list.


6th October – 16th November



Beyond Light

“This latest body of work aims to explore symbolically, both the outer political, social and cultural landscapes of our time, as well as the inner landscapes of the human psyche.

These landscapes are painted intuitively and without any pre-editing, or reference to any particular place in mind.  They evolve naturally and without scrutiny, which allows for a narrative to unfold.

The writings from Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, “For this appalling ocean surrounds this verdant land, so in the soul of man there lies one insular Tahiti, full of peace and joy, but encompassed by all the horrors of the half-lived life” was a starting point to this work and was influential in anchoring the context both at an existential level and ethereal level.


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“Consider the subtleness of the sea; how it’s most dreaded creatures glide underwater, unapparent for the most part, and treacherously hidden beneath the loveliest tints of azure… consider all this; and then turn to this green, gentle and most docile earth; consider them both, the sea and the land; and do you not find strange analogy to something in yourself?” Herman Melville. “


4th September – 5th October


‘Tradeston R.I.P.’

“As a photographer, the Tradeston area of Glasgow interests me very much. Tradeston is bounded by the River Clyde to the north, the Glasgow to Paisley railway line to the south, Eglinton Street and Bridge Street to the east and West Street to the west. The M74 Extension traverses the hotchpotch of abandoned tenements, burnt out wastelands, low rise 1970’s industrial units, and some new flatted developments – a testament to decades of poor planning and congenital mismanagement by the City Fathers. Tradeston should represent “an open goal” for any Glasgow City Council administration, and should be at the heart of regeneration in the city. Up until now, regeneration has progressed (not always well) in many areas, yet Tradeston, so close to the city centre, remains neglected. The city needs to regenerate that part. It would be pivotal in reconnecting the Southside back across the river.


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I was keen to document this area as it is now, before any proposed regeneration commences – if it ever happens.
Glasgow must be the only city in Europe with a major waterway running through it which does not exploit that in any way. If you go to many European cities such as Bristol, you can see that they have converted their disused docks and shabby warehouses into bars, artspaces, accommodation and shops to create an appealing area for locals and tourists alike to visit and enjoy themselves.

Somehow I don’t think this is going to happen any time soon in Tradeston R.I.P.”

Alastair’s recent exhibitions:
2016 ‘On Returning’ Harbour Arts Centre, Irvine
2016 ‘An Roghainn’ (collaboration with poet Kenneth Steven) Aros Centre, Portree
2017 ‘An Roghainn’ Stanza Poetry Festival, St Andrews
2017 Excerpts from ‘An Roghainn’ Scottish Poetry Library, Edinburgh


1st August 2017 – 31st August 2017


Enzo Marra’s creative practice is concerned with the exploration and pictorial analysis of the art world. He explores the juxtaposing perceptions of those involved and those outwith the industry, their valuing and auctioning, the processes and activities that occur behind the privacy of studio doors, the hanging and display of works animated by the commodified space of the gallery, the milling of observers in exhibition spaces, and ultimately how the public presence then gives life and purpose to the works on display.

The use of texture is of great importance to his practice – lending both added dimensions to the oil paints as well as necessary dominance to his brushwork, which is visible within the final image. The physical dragging and building up of pigment is as relevant in his creations as the tonality and colour balance that they are used to express.

In Siblings, Marra has selected a number of figurative-inspired works, alongside palette-based works, which wholly reflect his own painting practice, whilst providing the leverage to further explore such interrelationships.  The intricate balance between studio activity and what is permitted for public viewing, and the concept of authentic and true pigment application, is explored in this series of acrylic, enamel and oil canvases.

These works have enabled Marra to be selected for the Creekside Open in 2013, 2015 and 2017; the Threadneedle Prize in 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2016; Beep Wales in 2014 and 2016; Gfest in 2010; Charlie Smith Anthology in 2011; the Open West at Gloucester Cathedral in 2012 and the John Moores Painting Prize in 2012 and 2016.

Marra was a prizewinner in the Creekside Open 2017 – selected by Jordan Baseman – and was included on the shortlist for the 100 Painters of Tomorrow. He was also given an honourable mention in the Beers Contemporary Award for Emerging Art 2013.


BEST OF DEGREE SHOW 2017 at Six Foot Gallery

1st July 2017 – 30th July 2017

Six Foot Gallery is delighted to present the 2017 edition of our annual BEST OF DEGREE SHOW. The exhibition features the work of graduating artists, handpicked from Scotland’s leading art institutions. Artworks range across a variety of themes and mediums, as a representation of the diversity of Scotland’s emerging artistic talent.

Exhibiting Artists

Aillie Anderson

Annabel Chau

Bastian Birk Thuesen

Cormac Banks

David Brown

Dominika Kupcova

Dougie Blane

Emily Watson

Emma Strathdee

Euan Paton

Evie Caldwell

Ewan Arthur

Ishbel Mackenzie

Iona Lundie

Jack Dunnett

James A. McKenzie

Jennifer Souter

Joanne Hall

Joe Bloom

Louis Bennett

Mhari Davidson

Nicolle Gavin

Nikol Kantri Mylona

Ross Jordan

Ross Miller

Sarah Rogers

Shine Robert Christensen

Sylvia Tarvet

Zoe Hodgett




@ButtermilkWave // Alexandra Sarah

22nd May 2017 – 22nd June 2017

Started in 2016 by Europe-based photographer Alexandra Sarah, @ButtermilkWave is an ongoing project – a concept, an abstract idea through which the artist focuses mainly on intimate minimalistic portraiture – with a hint of fashion – to express her own state of mind.

Just like buttermilk itself, the portraits are both bitter and sweet, with a touch of acid and darkness, yet still soothing and ever-flowing. This represents the artist’s mentality; her personal experience with depression contradicts with her positive outlook and faith in the world, her heaviness of heart fighting every single day with her lively character.

Even though Alexandra Sarah employs image processing software, such as Photoshop, to better create her concept visually, she does not use it to alter personal characteristics or erase “flaws” – for she does not believe they exist. By engaging into more minimal approaches, and through the use of mostly cold and pastel tones, she makes her subjects her sole centre of attention, and brings out the genuine beauty that lies in each and every person.

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Stephanie #134